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The Dutch former Colonies

Ghana

  Fort Metal Cross  Dixcove

In the 1680’s, the Ahantaland around Inhuman settlement was a bone of contention between the English and the Brandenburg.

The English were determined to acquire land there to build a fort because many English interloper captains were accustomed to trading at Fort Gross Fredericksburg to the detriment of English commerce.

The chief of Upper/Greater Dixcove leased to the English a promontory site near Inhuman village, located on the shore of a large and sheltered bay, later designated as Dick’s Cove (Dixcove).

The Cove’s calm waters and sandy beach made it an ideal “harbour” for canoes and small boats while ships could anchor about 3 kilometres offshore.

The Royal African Company commenced construction of the fort in 1692 but was unable to complete it until 1698 because of spasmodic attacks by the Ahanta people which continued well into the 18th century on account of the presence of the Dutch fort Babenstein at Butre.

The original fort, as seen and described by writers like Jean Barbot, was square with a pointed bastion at each corner except for the southwest corner which had a round tower.

Curtain walls linked the bastions and tower.

The inner structure comprised apartments, storage rooms and kitchen arranged round a small courtyard.

Subsequently there were several alterations to the original structure: a spur ending with a bastion, which was constructed in the 1St century, consisted of garrison apartments storage rooms and a workshop.

One of the hollow bastions in the main section of the fort was employed as a slave prison.

By 1750, the fort was equipped to carry up to 25 canons.

 

Fort Metal Cross,  Dixcove

 
 

Fort Metal Cross,  Dixcove

 

Fort Metal Cross,  Dixcove

 

Fort Metal Cross,  Dixcove

 

Fort Metal Cross,  Dixcove

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